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SIGCSE 2016

2016-03-05 14.04.23

Virginia Tech students and alums at SIGCSE 2016

SIGCSE 2016, the flagship conference on computer science education, took place in Memphis TN in March, with a big collection of Virginia Tech students, faculty, and alumni taking on a variety of important roles. My grad student Mohammed Seyam and I presented a paper on teaching mobile software development with Pair Programming. Cliff Shaffer and his students and alums had multiple papers and exhibits. Greg Kulczycki served on a panel.  And, most notably, Steve Edwards was program co-chair this year!

Mohammed Seyam’s paper and talk focused on Teaching Mobile Development with Pair Programming. It explored his investigation of Pair Programming (PP) when teaching mobile software design in an upper level CS course. PP has been shown to be useful in some teaching situations, but Mohammed is the first to look at it in teaching mobile. He also had an entry in the graduate Student Research Competition that took a broader look at the balance between PP, hands-on activities, and traditional lectures when teaching mobile software design, for which he was named a finalist.

As always, SIGCSE featured interesting and engaging keynotes. John Sweller talked about the impacts of cognitive load theory on CS education. Barbara Boucher Owens and Jan Cuny received service awards from SIGCSE and gave keynotes that reflected their life experiences. It was particularly good to see Jan Cuny receive an award given her contributions to diversity in leading broadening participation in computing programs at the NSF. Karen Lee Ashcraft talked about breaking the glass slipper, and how organizations historically (and continually) have crafted jobs and workplaces that encourage stereotypes. This was a bolder and more developed version of a talk she gave at NCWIT 2015.

One of my favorite emerging things at SIGCSE is the Common Reads initiative, which returned for its second year. It’s an effort to encourage SIGCSE attendees to read a common set of CS-related materials. There are stickers for conference badges that are handed out at registration to highlight who’s read what, thus providing another avenue to start conversations. And there’s a conference session one evening to discuss the readings, how they relate to CS, and how they can be used with students. This year’s books were all science fiction: The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson, Ancillary Justice by Ann Leckie, A Logic Named Joe by Will F. Jenkins, and Seven Years from Home by Naomi Novik. These books and stories touch on core CS themes like AI, parallel computing, fault tolerance. While thee themes are certainly relevant to CS, it seems important to me to promote topics other than just science fiction to support a breadth of interests.  As such, for SIGCSE 2017the most intriguing common read to me is The Thrilling Adventures of Lovelace & Babbage: The (Mostly) True Story of the First Computer by Sydney Padua. It’s a comic-style reimagining of CS heroes Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage, exploring a world in which they collaborated closely to build and use a computer. There are a couple of other sci-fi entries included as well, Andy Weir’s The Martian (yes, the book that the movie is based on) and Isaac Asimov’s The Last Question short story.

It was fun to connect with the VT crowd on the LONG van ride across Tennessee to Memphis. The Memphis area is a little depressed, but there seem to be efforts at renovation, and the food and music were a great indulgence. It was fun to be just a few feet from the Mississippi River during the conference, and we were able to duck across the border to neighboring Arkansas and Mississippi on our drive.  We also had quick visits to Nashville and Kingston going to and from the conference. Next year’s SIGCSE will be in Seattle, so it’s unlikely we’ll drive to that venue!

Several others put together writeups about this event as well. CS@VT blogged about VT’s participation in SIGCSE (excerpts from this post), and Georgia Tech put forth a press release about the event. Mark Guzdial from Georgia Tech has several blog posts about Jan Cuny’s SIGCSE Outstanding Contribution award and a description of one of his posters replicating his earlier work. It was enlightening to read about the frustrations in publishing replicated work. There’s real value there but so many venues put much more value on innovation rather than replication. Janet Davis blogged about her experiences at SIGCSE from her perspective as a faculty member starting a new CS department. Georgia Tech and NCWIT had groups there too, and it was great to connect with them. And I’m sure there’s much more writeups about SIGCSE that I missed–feel free to include other relevant links in the comments.

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